Columbia-led Physics team wins 1st Prize in 2022 Buchalter Cosmology Prize Competition!

Columbia Physics continues to be a trailblazing force in the field of Cosmology with the announcement that a team led by Physics PhD student Sam Goldstein was named the 1st place winner of the 2022 Buchalter Cosmology Prize.  The award-winning research also included contributions from Columbia Post-Doc Oliver Philcox, Professor Lam Hui, Assistant Professor Colin Hill, former Columbia PhD student Angelo Esposito and former Columbia PhD student Max Abitbol. 

 

January 12, 2023

Columbia Physics continues to be a trailblazing force in the field of Cosmology with the announcement that a team led by Physics PhD student Sam Goldstein was named the 1st place winner of the 2022 Buchalter Cosmology Prize.  The award-winning research also included contributions from Columbia Post-Doc Oliver Philcox, Professor Lam Hui, Assistant Professor Colin Hill, former Columbia PhD student Angelo Esposito and former Columbia PhD student Max Abitbol. 

The Buchalter Cosmology Prize is annually awarded and is intended to support innovative and cutting-edge research in theoretical, observational, and experimental cosmology. The Columbia-led team was recognized for their publication “Squeezing fNL out of the matter bispectrum with consistency relations” which highlighted how consistency relations can be used to robustly extract the amplitude of local primordial non-Gaussianity (fNL) from the squeezed limit of the matter bispectrum, well into the non-linear regime. 

The Buchalter prize committee declared the winning research “a powerful and original approach, demonstrating that consistency relations characterizing local primordial non-Gaussianity can be used to constrain basic principles of inflationary models with minimal assumptions, opening the door to strong tests of fundamental physics with future cosmological surveys.” 

The Columbia University Astrophysics, Gravitational Wave Physics and Cosmology division of Columbia Physics is a robust and thriving subsector. Astrophysics, the study of black holes, neutron stars, gamma ray bursts, and other novel physical objects and processes in the universe, has seen tremendous improvement in the capabilities of observational techniques in the last 10 to 20 years.  New generations of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments are planned and being built, which will lead to ever more precise measurements of the CMB and the imprint of the early universe that it carries. 

Please join us in congratulating these state-of-the-art scientists on this incredible achievement!